The Head of State is Leading Our Nation, in Social!

Gone are the days when the president hosted Fireside Chats over the radio (cough, Franklin D. Roosevelt). Welcome today’s digital age, introducing…SOCIAL MEDIA, a fast and direct way of communicating and engaging with individuals worldwide!
 
Politics and social media are merging, becoming more intertwined than ever before.  Let’s take a look at the social media efforts from 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue…
 
Obama and the White House staff are the first Administration actively using various social media tools including Facebook, Twitter, Google+, YouTube, Instagram, Pinterest, and the list goes on…

http://bits.blogs.nytimes.com/2008/11/07/how-obamas-internet-campaign-changed-politics/

Do you use social media as a way of engaging with politics? If yes, how? Do you follow President Obama and the White House on Twitter?

If not, start now!

President Barack Obama: https://twitter.com/BarackObama
White House: https://twitter.com/whitehouse
Macon Phillips: https://twitter.com/macon44

Feel like reading more on this topic? Check out…

Pew Research Center’s study entitled, “The Internet’s Role in Campaign 2008: A majority of American adults went online in 2008 to keep informed about political developments and to get involved with the election.”
http://web.pewinternet.org/~/media/Files/Reports/2009/The_Internets_Role_in_Campaign_2008.pdf

 

 

 

Crowdbooster Presents: Brands keeping it real no.1

I get sad whenever I see a tweet that sounds more like advertising than the start of a conversation. I whine about uninspired posts that were created to get cheap likes. 

I wonder if marketers will ever come around to understanding that social media is about becoming part of the conversation and not interrupt it with buzzkill advertising copy.

Social media is an opportunity for brands to open up and invite us in to see the what they are about. It’s authentic, it’s personal, it’s human.

For my own sanity’s sake, I’m going to blog about brands that get it, and showcase them here on the Crowdbooster blog. Here’s my first post, tell me if you like it.

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Does the future of community management lie in transactions?

In our last post, we explored Pinterest’s potential for social media marketing and community management efforts. As the network continues to grow, however, some brands are leveraging the social network in a different manner. Most notable of these instances comes from Gilt’s “unlockable pins” campaign. According to TechCrunch, this new feature allows pinners to access a hidden link once a pin has been repinned at least 50 times. This promotional link remains exclusive to Pinterest followers and cannot be accessed anywhere else on the Gilt’s site.

Sephora provides us with a clear example of the “like-gating” banner (courtesy of Hubspot). 

As we consider the future of social media marketing, these approaches to community management will continually be called into question. Sure, there are undoubtedly short term benefits of these campaigns for brands. Social media managers can pinpoint the ROI of such promotions based on increased (albeit artificial) engagement. But is this transaction-based engagement truly where we want to steer the social media marketing industry? After all, it seems these transactions cheapen the community’s experience. 

Why can’t we focus on the long-term advantages and power of an engaged community? Brands need to be constantly reminded that social media isn’t a simple task. There can be a place for easy to execute promotional campaigns, but true online engagement stems from hours of immersion within your own community. As Ekaterina Walter, social strategist at Intel, writes on MarketingProfs, brands should provide compelling and interactive content. This varies from industry to industry and network to network, but it’s increasingly clear that social media is valid force in marketing. As the industry flourishes, we’ll learn to measure and appreciate the long-term benefits of sustained community engagement. What do you think? Have you tried to justify time spent truly interacting and relating to the community? How difficult was that?